Haflingers headed your way!



The Haflinger is an old breed of small horse that originated in the Tyrolean mountains of Austria. All modern day Haflingers can be traced to 1874 and the foundation sire 249 Folie. Folie was a result of a cross between a refined, native mountain mare and the half-Arab stallion 133 EL Bedavi XXII

Haflingers are chestnut in color, ranging from light blonde to chocolate with full, thick manes and tails that range from white to flaxen. They range in size from 13 to 15 hands and weigh from 800 to 1300 pounds.

Haflingers exhibit free and easy movements with a long stride and smooth, correct gaits. As a result of selective breeding, Haflingers are hardy, long lived, strong and sure footed animals. Haflingers are best known for their disposition and remarkable versatility. They are dependable horses even after long periods of inactivity. They're affectionate, eager to please dispositions make them hard to resist. This unique combination of breed traits is what makes the Haflinger "America's Family Horse".

Our Modern Haflingers are primarily Austrian Imports or first generation domestic. We are proud members and supporters of the American Haflinger Registry (AHR).


Below are photos of some of our fine breeding stock.



A  HORSE’S  PRAYER


"Feed me, water me and care for me.  And when my day’s work is done, provide me with shelter, a clean, dry bed, and a stall wide enough for me to lie down in comfort. 

Talk to me.  Your voice often means as much to me as the reins.

Pet me sometimes, that I may serve you the more gladly and learn to love you.

Do not jerk the reins and do not whip me when going uphill.

Never strike, beat or kick me when I do not understand what you mean, but give me a chance to understand.

Watch me, and if I fail to do your bidding, see if something is wrong with my harness or feet.  Examine my teeth when I do not eat.  I may have an ulcerated tooth that is very painful.

Do not tie my head in an unnatural position, or take away my best defense against flies by cutting off my tail.  (I don’t take away YOUR mosquito curtains.)

Don’t smoke in my barn or leave me tied up overnight and perhaps burn me to death while you are sleeping in your comfortable bed.

And last, my master:  When my strength is gone, do not turn me out in a pasture with no shelter and le me freeze to death, or sell me to some cruel owner to be slowly starved or worked to death, but take my life in the kindest way, and your God will reward you – hereafter."

                                                                                              - Author Unknown